Fabric Guide

Fabric Guide

Chiffon
Chiffon is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe (high-twist) yarns. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions after weaving, giving it some stretch and a slightly rough feel. Chiffon is made from cotton, silk or synthetic fibres. Under a magnifying glass it resembles a fine net or mesh which gives chiffon some see-through properties.

Terylene
Terylene also known as Dacron is a synthetic polyester fiber. It is characterised by weightlessness and crease resistance. Terylene is mostly used to make light, crease-resistant clothin, bed linens, ropes, sheets, and many others. The name ‘terylene fabric’ may also refer to any large class of synthetic fabric.

Organza Silk
Silk Organza is a sheer, thin open-weave fabric that is heavier and crisper than silk gauze. It has a smooth, flat finish, is strong and durable, and gets its stiffness from tightly twisted yarns. Often used as the base fabric for embellished fabrics.

This plain weave sheer silk is made with a loose plain weave and tightly twisted yarns that have 10 to 20 turns per inch. Organza is similar to cotton organdy except it is made with silk and is transparent. Organza has a crisp drape, which requires special sewing techniques for seams, facings, and hems because they can be seen from the outside of the garment. It is mostly used for interfacing, veils, and undergowns.

Chiffon Silk
Chiffon literally means “rag” in French. This elegant, sheer fabric is quite limp, with a beautiful drape. It has a soft, supple, thin hand and a flat, crepe-like texture.It made from silk, cotton, nylon, polyester, or rayon.It is basically refers to a light plain woven sheer fabric. It is delicate in appearance, it is a relatively strong, balanced fabric and can be dyed or printed for use in dresses, millinery, scarves, and lampshades. This fabric can be difficult to work with because of its light and slippery textures. Due to this delicate nature, chiffon must be hand washed very gently.It adds a magical look to the dress and wearer’s personality.

A very light, diaphanous fabric, Chiffon is made with a loose, plain weave and tightly twisted single crêpe yarns in both warp and weft. Unlike in crêpe de Chine, the weft yarn is either S or Z twist. The characteristic wrinkles in the finished fabric are created by the weft yarns being pulled in one direction.
Chiffon is elegant and sheer, with a slightly rough feel to it. Sometimes called Crepe Chiffon, this fabric is highly suited for special occasion dresses, Scarves, nightgowns, and linings. Chiffon is softer and thinner than Georgette. [Georgette is made like chiffon, but with a two or three ply yarn.] Because of its slippery quality, chiffon is difficult to cut and sew.

This fabric is a good choice for manufacturing blouses,dupattas and various types of ladies dresses. It is also used for making bridal gowns,scarves and evening and formal wears

Crepe Fabric
A fabric characterized by a crinkled, puckered or pebbly surface with highly twisted yarns in the weft and sometimes in the warp or both. Crepe is usually made with a plain weave. The crinkly texture of this soft and pliable fabric can be smooth or quite rough. The fabric is woven from all of the major fibers, natural or man-made. Surface textures range from fine, flat crepes to pebbled and mossy effects; some surfaces resemble tree bark.

Crepe Silk
Silk Crepe is a luxurious fabric with a good sheen and a pebbly texture obtained by using high twist yarns. Silk Crepe has a beautiful drape, and is extensively used to make dresses, slacks, skirts, lightweight suits, bridal gowns, and evening wear.

Crepe de Chine
Crepe de Chine (‘krape dee sheen’), French for “Crepe from China,” is similar to Silk Crepe, but lighter weight and less textured fabric made with S and Z highly twisted filament yarns alternating in the weft and with a normally twisted filament warp. The matte surface and pebbled texture of this graceful fabric reflect individual pinpoints of light, giving it wonderful chromatic depth and striking eye-appeal. This luxurious silk has the additional virtues of great durability and excellent wrinkle resistance. Lightweight with a pleasing drape, designers choose it among silk fabrics for elegant slacks, skirts, dresses, suits, and eveningwear.

Crepe/Geogette Yarn
Twisted yarn usually with 2000 to 3600 tpm (twists per meter), generally made of two threads of raw silk.

Crepe Yarn
Highly twisted yarn generally with 1200 to 4000 tpm (twists per meter) used for producing crepe effect in woven or knit fabrics.

Georgette Silk
Fine, lightweight, plain weave, crêpe fabric, usually having two highly twisted S and two highly twisted Z yarns alternately in both warp and weft. Made of crepe yarn, silk georgette has a grainy texture, a sheer feel, and a thin, very dry hand. It is heavier than chiffon, and is similar to silk crepe, but is not as soft or lustrous as crepe. Georgette is durable, but snags easily. Drapes very fluidly, and falls into soft ripples.

With its creped surface, this sheer and strong silk fabric is great for blouses, bias-cut flared skirts, evening wear, dresses, and scarves. Doesn’t show pin marks, and doesn’t hold a crease. Relatively difficult to sew.

Kashmere Silk
Silk fabric made with 2/1 right hand twill weave that gives a soft finish.

Momme Weight
Silk momme is equal to about 3.62 grams per squar e yard or 4.33 grams per square meter (designated as mm)

Chiffon- 6 to 8 mm
Crepe de Chine-12 to 18 mm
Georgette-8 to 12 mm
Organza-4 to 6 mm

Organza Silk
Silk Organza is a sheer, thin open-weave fabric that is heavier and crisper than silk gauze. It has a smooth, flat finish, is strong and durable, and gets its stiffness from tightly twisted yarns. Often used as the base fabric for embellished fabrics.

This plain weave sheer silk is made with a loose plain weave and tightly twisted yarns that have 10 to 20 turns per inch. Organza is similar to cotton organdy except it is made with silk and is transparent. Organza has a crisp drape, which requires special sewing techniques for seams, facings, and hems because they can be seen from the outside of the garment. It is mostly used for interfacing, veils, and undergowns.

Velvet Chiffon
Chiffon velvet is a type of velvet that is very lightweight, allowing it to drape in a variety of ways. It is often used in lingerie and other intimate items, and it also appears sometimes in formal dresses and skirts. Many fabric stores carry this velvet in an assortment of colors for people who want to custom-make garments, and various examples can also be seen in antique stores and in department stores in modern garments.

This style of velvet is sometimes called “transparent velvet,” in a reference to its sheer nature. The backing is typically silk or rayon, with a rayon pile. Like other velvets, chiffon velvet is woven in such a way that it has a very deep, complex texture, and it is also very stretchy and forgiving. The pile can be left plain or embossed with various designs, depending on the manufacturer’s inclination and the demand for a particular style.

Viscose
Viscose is a solution of cellulose xanthate made by treating a cellulose compound with sodium hydroxide and carbon disulfide. Byproducts include sodium thiocarbonate, sodium carbonate, and sodium sulfide.[1] The viscose solution is used to spin the fiber viscose rayon, or rayon, a soft man-made fiber commonly used in dresses, linings, shirts, shorts, coats, jackets, and other outer wear. It is also used in industrial yarns (tyre cord), upholstery and carpets.

Voile
Voile is a soft, sheer fabric, usually made of 100% cotton or cotton blends including linen or polyester. The term comes from French, and means veil. Because of its light weight, the fabric is mostly used in soft furnishing.

Voiles are available in a range of patterns and colors. Voile fabric is also used in dress-making, either in multiple layers or laid over a second material. Voile is very similar to chiffon, which is also used in dress-making.

Light penetrating sheer fabrics include muslin, voile, and lace. These can be broadly divided into two groups based on method of production. The first are the natural fibers such as cotton and silk and are used in such items as scarves, dresses, blouses and other fashion apparel. The second group is prepared from a man-made fiber. This kind of synthetic sheer is extracted from raw material such as wood pulp or petroleum. They are robust and sturdy yet still delicate looking and tend to take dye well. They are often used as window dressing as they fall into soft folds that make attractive scarf swags.